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Why Study a Master's Degree?

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Last Updated:

21st January 2014

First Published:

23rd May 2013

reasons to study a masters degree

 

Whether you’re nearing the end of your undergrad or you graduated several years ago, the decision to do a Master’s degree is not always an easy one. If you’re looking for some positives to help justify the extra costs of further study, though, then you’ll be glad to know you’ve come to the right place…
 
Why Study a Master’s Degree?
 
1. Improving your job prospects – as we’re all painfully aware, the graduate job market isn’t at its best at the moment. If you’re struggling to kick-start your career, a Master’s degree with a vocational focus can easily give you the edge over rival applicants.
 
2. Learning new skills – whether you’re interested in a purely vocational Master’s or one that’s more grounded in theory and research, you’ll be sure to learn a plethora of new skills during the course of your further study.
 
3. Furthering your education – if you’re one of those people who has an insatiable thirst for knowledge, you may find that a three-year undergraduate degree just isn’t enough. If you’re keen to expand your knowledge of a specific subject area and learn more, a Master’s degree could be the answer.
 
4. Progressing on to a PhD – if you really love academia and are considering staying on to do a PhD, a Master’s is not only the perfect gateway, but also the perfect test (as it will help you realise whether or not life in full-time academia is the right decision).
 
5. Making contacts – Master’s degrees often have smaller class sizes and stronger alumni networks than undergrad courses. This means you’ll have the chance to not only meet a group of like-minded people, but also build useful career contacts for the future.
 
 
>Search for Master's degrees on Postgraduate Search
 

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