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Key information
DATA SOURCE : IDP Connect

Qualification type

MSc - Master of Science

Subject areas

Zooarchaeology

Course type

Taught

Course Summary

On this course you will study archaeological animal remains on a macro and micro scale to investigate what they tell us about how humans and other species have co-existed over the millennia. The scope of the course is global, equipping you with the knowledge and techniques to study the roles of animals in human societies from the Palaeolithic to the present, around the world. You will have the opportunity to select modules taught by leading academics in both traditional and biomolecular zooarchaeology, and options led by dedicated specialists in evolutionary anatomy, enabling you to master the latest analytical techniques and examine skeletal anatomy. This course covers the practical skills, analytical techniques, and interpretative frameworks necessary to study the roles of animals in past societies from the bones and other remains that we find on archaeological sites. Many of our Zooarchaeology students go on to conduct further research at PhD level. Others progress into careers with archaeological units, museum services, conservation bodies and a range of other organisations.

Different course options

Full time | University of York | 1 year | SEP

Study mode

Full time

Duration

1 year

Start date

SEP

Modules

You will undertake a dissertation (15-20,000 words) and assessed lecture as part of the course. You will have a supervisor throughout this time who will be able to help and guide you through the process.

Tuition fees

UK fees
Course fees for UK / EU students

For this course (per year)

£7,810

Average for all Postgrad courses (per year)

£5,202

International fees
Course fees for non-UK / EU students

For this course (per year)

£17,370

Average for all Postgrad courses (per year)

£12,227

Entry requirements

Applicants need to have a good honours degree (upper second or first class) in a relevant subject, or an equivalent qualification from an overseas institution in archaeology, anthropology or a related field. Graduates in a biological subject will also be considered, as will mature students or those with less conventional qualifications but with relevant experience.